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IRAN NOT BUDGING ON NUCLEAR WEAPONS CAPABILITY

Secretary of State Kerry: Nuclear talks will be extended by another seven months.

 Israel has breathed a collective sigh of relief. There is good news and bad news over the decision to extend the Nov. 24th deadline and negotiate on Iran's nuclear project for another seven months. The good news is that U.S. President Barack Obama and the other members of the 5P+1 have not agreed to a nuclear deal at any price - the bad news is they have acquiesced in Iran's stonewalling without increasing the sanctions. Iran's sweet-talking President Hassan Rouhani was more than pleased with the diplomatic outcome in Vienna:

 "We have achieved a significant victory - the negotiations will lead to a deal, sooner or later."

 And his boss, Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei warned that he would not budge in the upcoming round of negotiations:

 "The American and European colonialist countries gathered and applied their entire efforts to bring the Islamic Republic to its knees, but they could not and will not." 

The sanctions were enough to bring Iran to the table, but not sufficient to force them to give up their nuclear weapons facilities ... It appears that Ayatollah Khamenei and Rouhani believe the West will eventually blink first and give in.

25 Reading between the lines, Khamenei, backed by his powerful Revolutionary Guards, signaled their regime has absolutely no intention of backing down on their goal of preserving their nuclear capacity to build A-bombs in the future. They only agreed to enter the talks after Obama and the West finally got serious about imposing sanctions. But make no mistake, Iran has not agreed to give up their centrifuges that have been used to enrich uranium that can be upgraded to produce A-bombs. The sanctions were enough to bring Iran to the table, but not sufficient to force them to give up their nuclear weapons facilities. (Another example is the Iranians' absolute refusal to permit IAEA experts to inspect the Parchin military base where Israel has said it has 'reliable information' that nuclear detonators were tested there.

 

 So what happens now? It appears that Ayatollah Khamenei and Rouhani believe the West will eventually blink first and give in.

 

PM Netanyahu addressing the UN General Assembly

 Israel's role: Prime Minister Netanyahu has adopted a two-track stance on Iran, which has threatened to wipe the Jewish state off the map. First, 'no deal is better than a bad deal' and Israel has not given up the military option to prevent an Iranian A-bomb. Now, U.S. Secretary of State Kerry has said the world is safer than it was a year ago when the Iranians were accelerating their nuclear project. At present, they have suspended their uranium enrichment project and stopped building their Arak plutonium reactor that could also produce weapons grade plutonium for a nuclear weapon. Kerry took a potshot at Netanyahu by saying the Iranians had honored their commitments during the recent negotiations. Both Kerry and Obama were adamant that Iran must be prevented from building nuclear weapons.

 

No one should underestimate the Iranians - for years they succeeded in operating clandestine nuclear facilities that were only discovered after a period of time.

 So can the Jewish state and the rest of Iran's Arab neighbors, as well as Turkey, relax when it comes to a nuclear-armed Iran? That depends. Throughout the region, the Iranians are known and take pride in their skillful bargaining - Rouhani himself wrote once about duping Western negotiators in the past about Iran's nuclear weapons project. No one should underestimate the Iranians - for years they succeeded in operating clandestine nuclear facilities that were only discovered after a period of time. In other words, the dictum holds true: 'We don't know what we don't know'.

 

... like North Korea, the Iranian regime views nuclear weapons as an insurance policy for its continued existence and its own aspirations for regional hegemony in the Middle East.

 What's more, Iran is a close ally of North Korea, which has pulled the wool over America's eyes in developing its own nuclear weapons capability. What is to prevent Tehran from secretly buying nuclear components from Pyongyang? What must be understood is that like North Korea, the Iranian regime views nuclear weapons as an insurance policy for its continued existence and its own aspirations for regional hegemony in the Middle East. They have already invested over one billion dollars on the nuclear project, including the cost of sanctions - this by a country awash in oil.

 

IDF (ret.) Brigadier General Yossi Kuperwasser

 Although no details from the Vienna talks have been disclosed, IDF (ret.) Brigadier General Yossi Kuperwasser, currently the director-general at the Ministry of Intelligence Affairs, has estimated that Iran currently has sufficient enriched uranium that can be upgraded for one A-Bomb within a period of weeks. It can be assumed that Israel's Air Force will continue honing its operational capability to carry out a military strike, if the Iranians keep stalling for the next seven months.

 

Last month, fourteen women had sulfuric acid thrown in their faces in the city of Isfahan. One woman died of her wounds, the others were badly disfigured.

 But behind President Rouhani, Iran's show-piece for the international community, what can be expected from the Ayatollahs' Islamic regime, which bears indirect responsibility for the recent wave of acid attacks on young Iranian women as punishment for being 'badly veiled'? Last month, fourteen women had sulfuric acid thrown in their faces in the city of Isfahan. One woman died of her wounds, the others were badly disfigured.

 

(photo credit: courtesy of twitter)

 The attacks were actually triggered by Iran's parliament, which recently passed a law 'to protect citizens who feel compelled to correct men and women who do not comply with Iran's religious laws'. In addition to Parliament, the judiciary also approved the law. For what it's worth, President Rouhani condemned the attacks.

 

 

 

 David Essing

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