(Banner will apear here)

Beautiful Kabbalah Jewelry Judaicawebstore.com
Font Size:

Hospital Clowns On Sex-Abuse Treatment Team

Embracing laughter as one of the best medicines

Israel first in the world to develop professional medical clowning

Shoshi Ofir’s work is serious, despite the getup.(photo credit: ISRAEL21c)

 In full clown garb, Shoshi Ofir leads the way from the main street of the Baruch Padeh (Poriya) Medical Center compound to a small building purposely situated in a slightly secluded location.

 “This is the Tene Center,” she announces proudly, pointing to the unassuming edifice with her shiny green purse, shaped like a watering can.

 The red rubber ball covering her nose, and the pink plastic boots grabbing the bottoms of her colorful coveralls, glisten in the strong Tiberias sun.

“Unlike the kids with physical ailments, no matter how life-threatening, victims of sexual abuse have had the ‘battery’ of their spirit killed...They come here with deadened expressions, unable to make eye contact.”

 Ofir, 50, whose family immigrated to Israel from South Africa when she was seven, is speaking Hebrew with a convincing Argentinean accent, exhibiting a fraction of the many roles she assumes as a full-time medical clown. She slips just as comfortably into a French accent, eliciting smiles from Tene’s staff — which includes a gynecologist, a colorectal surgeon, a pediatrician, a social worker, nurses, two other medical clowns and a secretary.

 The Tene Center for the Treatment of Sexual Assault Victims, established in 2001, is the first treatment center in the world that uses medical clowns as part of the protocol for sexual-abuse victims.

 Broken and fearful

 Ofir acknowledges that what goes on within the cheerfully decorated treatment center is no laughing matter. The majority of the patients are children and teenagers, and they arrive in a state beyond trauma. Helping them heal, according to Ofir, is far more challenging even than cheering patients with fatal illnesses.

Medical clown Shoshi Ofir working with the medical staff and a young patient at the Tene Center. (photo credit: ISRAEL21c)

  “Unlike the kids with physical ailments, no matter how life-threatening, victims of sexual abuse have had the ‘battery’ of their spirit killed,” Ofir tells ISRAEL21c. “They come here with deadened expressions, unable to make eye contact.”

 These broken, fearful and suspicious individuals (85 percent female and 15 percent male, most between 11 and 18, according to 2013 data) arrive at Tene after referral by social services or the police. They are interviewed by a social worker and psychologist and examined by a gynecologist, which causes them great distress even though the examining table is embedded in a huge rubber hippopotamus with friendly eyes and a reassuring smile.


This article has been republished with permission by www.ISRAEL21c.org.  Click here to continue reading.

Ruthie Blum, ISRAEL21c

Back To The Top